The impact of Coronavirus (COVID-19) on Camden’s streets

The Covid-19 pandemic has created new road safety challenges in Camden.

We want to make it easier and safer for people to walk and cycle locally, shop on their local high street, reach their local green spaces, schools and NHS sites, all while maintaining physical distancing.

Thank you to everyone who suggested changes via our dedicated Commonplace map. Our map is closed now but you can still read all the comments. 

We are also looking to tackle challenges caused by changes in the way that people are traveling. This includes more people walking, cycling and using cars with people less likely and able to choose public transport. You can read a fact sheet of some of the challenges of Covid-19 on streets to find out more on the below issues. 

Extra pressure on our streets - more cars

Speeding is the main cause of road deaths so we want to keep your neighbourhoods safe from speeded by reducing traffic in residential streets. 

Across London, during the lockdown period, some average speeds were recorded at 37mph on 20mph roads. Locally, areas of Camden which already suffered from speeding problems saw speed increases of as much as 13%. 

So far 91% of lockdown traffic has returned. We know that in Camden 69% of households don't have a car and 8/10 of all trips aren't made by car. So providing safe and easy walking and cycling facilities is crucial. 

Extra pressure on our streets - more cycling. 

Early modelling by TfL has revealed there could be more than a 10-fold increase in kilometres cycled. We have already started to see more cycling in Camden.

Weekday cycle flows at two of our automatic cycle count point sites have recorded an average increase of 106% in cycling levels this August compared to last. 

We know lots more of you would like to give cycling a go and that many local children already walk, scoot or cycle to school. We are providing more cycle facilities to make cycling safer and easier than ever. As well as our free cycle training courses which are back up an running again to help you brush up on skills or get on the bike for the first time. 

Extra pressure on our streets - more walking

We are also aware that physical distancing requirements have meant that some areas of pavement are now too narrow for pedestrians to use safely so we are widening pavements in busy locations to make it safer and easier for you to move around.

The health of our residents is important to us - just a 20 minute walk can prevent long-term health conditions like Type 2 diabetes, heart disease and certain caners as well as being good for mental health.  

Extra pressure on our streets - boosting local economy  

Creating Streateries is one way we are supporting businesses to operate differently to ensure they are COVID secure. A Streatery is a car free outdoor dining space for restaurants, cafes and other businesses to place tables and chairs. Providing more temporary space for these businesses helps customers to physically distance whilst eating/drinking out. 

This will help boost hospitality businesses by giving more space for customers to take advantage of the remainder of the summer weather (and potentially for longer). These physically distanced tables will help boost the local economy, whilst keeping customers safe.

Extra pressure on our streets - helping air quality improvements continue

Breathing in polluted air can have long and short terms impacts on health at any stage of our life. During lockdown the reduction of traffic led to a decrease in pollutants in our air. We want to see air quality improvements continue so we are encouraging our communities to make healthy, green choices to walk and cycle more. 

You can read the single member decision report on our phase 1 changes and the non-key officer decision report for phase 2.

What changes we are making

To respond to these challenges quickly, we are making a series of safety-based changes to streets in Camden.

This includes widening pavements and reducing through traffic on residential streets. This will make it easier for people to access amenities and to use local roads to journey to key destinations or simply for exercise while staying 2m apart. 

We have identified a number of locations across the borough to begin to tackle these safety issues. These initial locations have been chosen as they meet one or more of the following criteria:

  • New safety issues involving physical distancing, walking or cycling have been highlighted to us as a result of Coronavirus  
  • Before the pandemic there had already been some local community engagement from existing projects which highlighted issues which we are looking to address
  • They are areas where we can make it easier and safer for people maintaining physical distancing while walking and cycling locally, to shop, reach their local green spaces, schools and NHS sites.

You can see the progress of the transport schemes across Camden since lockdown via our progress map.
 

Share your views

We know that there is an immediate need for these safety improvements in response to Coronavirus so we are using Experimental Traffic Orders where needed. These Experimental Traffic Orders, once made, can be brought into force relatively quickly.

We have already consulted with statutory emergency services on these changes and are also notifying local residents, businesses and stakeholder groups within the local area as well as adding information on the street.

You can read the notification letters below:

Experimental schemes: 

Pavement widening schemes (not requiring ETOs):

Streateries:

All experimental schemes will run for 18 months and you are able to comment at any time on the changes we have implemented. The Council would like to carry out a full public consultation after the experimental scheme has run for 12 months and will take a decision as to whether it can do this nearer the time in light of the circumstances then prevailing.

This consultation will then inform the Council’s decision as to whether, at the end of the 18-month experiment, the changes should be made permanent. Traffic levels will also be monitored, as required, on relevant streets after the scheme is implemented.

If you have any further questions or comments on the measures email: safetravel@Camden.gov.uk or call us on 020 7974 4444.

If you have a request for a Healthy School Street or would like to give feedback on existing schemes, please email: healthy.school.streets@camden.gov.uk

Cycling schemes

What is the challenge?

We know that more people are cycling due to Coronavirus. It is important that people travelling by bike are able to do so as safely and as comfortably as possible, and we know that many people will be taking up cycling for the first time or may be less experienced cycling on London’s busy roads. We have ambitious plans for our cycle network. This map (PDF) shows where we would like to add new pop up cycle lanes. We are currently applying for funding from TfL and the Department for Transport and information on upcoming schemes will be added below. 

Changes so far

We are improving or adding new cycling facilities at the following locations:

Chalk Farm Road – What are we doing?


We are making a number of changes in this location to support the increased number of people cycling locally and to support the Morrison’s development at Ferdinand Street/Juniper Crescent with improvements for cyclists and pedestrians.  

This includes installing a pop-up cycle lane on Chalk Farm Road between the junctions of Castlehaven Road and Prince of Wales Road, as well as improving the junction at Ferdinand Street for pedestrians and cyclists. 

What will the work involve?

Construction is currently underway. In this location we are making the following changes:

  • New segregated cycle lanes in both directions on Chalk Farm Road between Castlehaven Road and Prince of Wales Road, making it safer and easier for cyclists to travel around the area.
  • New signalised pedestrian crossings will be introduced at three locations along this route, making it safer and easier for people to cross the road.
  • Cycling, pedestrian and movement improvements at the junction with Ferdinand Street/ Juniper Crescent. This includes:
    • The introduction of, two-way traffic movement on the Juniper Crescent arm of the Junction
    • Removing the signalised junction currently in place on the exit of the Morrisons Petrol Station service road but retaining a signalised pedestrian crossing across Chalk Farm Road
    • An east-west movement, for cyclists only, across the junction between Juniper Crescent and Ferdinand Street
    • An an early release for cyclists on all arms of the junctions
    • A new signalised pedestrian crossing introduced across the southern arm of the Chalk Farm Road junction
    • Pedestrian countdown facilities will be introduced on all traffic lights on each arm of the junction. 
  • New bus stop boarder area. Bus stops will be moved out further into the carriageway, creating bus boarder areas (where cycle lanes run between the pavement and bus stops) and the cycle lane will be raised to the pavement level at bus stops. These changes will help protect bus journey times by preventing buses having to pull in and out of the kerbside.
  • Suspending the Bus lane on Haverstock Hill to allow adequate carriageway width and continuity of cycle lanes on both side of the road. Bus Stop CE to be relocated 100m north of its existing location on Chalk Farm Road. 
  • Relocating parking and loading provision from Chalk Farm Road onto neighbouring side streets, giving more space for pedestrians and cyclists while still supporting local business and resident use.

These changes are being made under an Experimental Traffic Order and construction will start in August. You can share your views and find out more on how to do this on our dedicated share your views page (see links at the top of this page). 

You can also read the Non-key executive officer decision report. You can also read the letter that was sent to all local residents, businesses and stakeholders. 

 

Goods Way - what are we doing?

We have improved the existing cycle lanes on Goods Way between Kings Boulevard and Pancras Road making it safer for cyclists. This includes:

  • Widening the existing cycle lanes from 1.5m to 2.2m in both directions
  • Adding “flexible wands” to separate the cycle lane from motor traffic
  • Adding extra signage to ensure that we can enforce  any vehicles illegally waiting or loading in the cycle lane
  • Adding additional signage to ensure that motor vehicles are more aware of cyclists

You can download a drawing of the changes we have made and view the decision report on our website.

Gray's Inn Road

What is the challenge on Gray's Inn Road?

While this scheme was not designed in response to Coronavirus it will reallocate road space to favour pedestrians and cyclists giving more space for people to physically distance

We know from previous engagement with the local community and stakeholders including a study carried out in 2016 (‘Kings Cross-Farringdon Public Realm”) that there are a number
of issues currently preventing people from walking and cycling in and through this area. Feedback from the local community highlighted issues within the area including:

  • High levels of traffic on residential streets in the area
  • The severance caused by major roads on communities and on pedestrians.
  • Cluttered streets
  • Lack of protected facilities for cyclists and the feeling of being unsafe.

We also know that Gray’s Inn Road is within the top 10% of roads in London providing the busiest cycle connections as well as suffering from high levels of road traffic casualties.

In response to these issues, we established a long-term vision to improve the network of streets between King’s Cross and Farringdon, including Gray’s Inn Road. These works are the third phase of this vision and will specifically target issues of road safety for pedestrians and cyclists. Protected cycle tracks, enhanced pedestrian facilities and upgraded junctions on Gray’s Inn Road will help deliver this.

Furthermore, one of the 17 recommendations from Camden’s Citizens Assembly on the Climate Crisis is to introduce more segregated cycle lanes throughout the Borough which this scheme will help to deliver .

What will the work involve?

Approval has now been given on a new scheme to improve cycling and walking along Gray’s Inn Road. The scheme was consulted on in winter 2019 and will bring road safety benefits and improvements to the public realm in this busy area. 

Enabling works have now begun on Gray's Inn Road to allow us to make the following changes over the coming months:

  • New segregated cycle lanes in both directions on Gray’s Inn Road between Harrison Street and High Holborn making it safer and easier for cyclists to travel around the area.
  • Cycling improvements at the junction with Ampton Street/ Sidmouth Street and Calthorpe Street/ Guilford Street.
  • New continuous pavements at selected junctions with side streets giving pedestrians priority in these location.
  • Bus stops along the corridor are to be consolidated (reduced in number and relocated to maintain spacing) to minimize the impact on bus journey times and journey reliability.
  • Relocating parking and loading provision onto neighbouring side streets giving more space for pedestrians and cyclists while still supporting local business and resident use.

How can I find out more?

As there is an immediate need for these safety improvements in response to Coronavirus we are using an Experimental Traffic Order, during the trial period we will work closely with businesses on Gray’s Inn Road to establish a sustainable and strategic Freight Action Plan for this corridor.

Once made this order can be brought into force relatively quickly. The experimental scheme will run for 18 months and you are able to comment at any time on the changes we have implemented. 

At the end of the trial period, we will not carry out another full public consultation on whether or not to make the scheme permanent. The decision on whether or not to make this scheme permanent will be taken using feedback provided and data collected during the trial period, as well as consideration of how this scheme contributes towards delivering Camden’s transport policies.

You can view the decision report online on our website which includes:

  • drawings of the changes taking place
  • A plan showing the changes to parking and loading
  • The Equalities Impact Assessment 

Jeffrey’s Street and Royal College Street - what are we doing?

We are minor changes for cyclists at the junction of Jeffrey’s Street and Royal College Street.  
Jeffrey’s Street (and its continuation into Wilmot Place) is a one-way (eastbound) street for all traffic except for cyclists who can travel in the opposite direction (westbound). 
Royal College Street is northbound only except for cyclists who can travel both north and south using the segregated cycle lanes on each side of the street. 
There is a currently a banned right turn for all eastbound traffic on Jeffrey’s Street to prevent them turning south into Royal College Street, in the wrong direction. 

What changes are we proposing to make?

Royal College Street is one of Camden’s core cycle routes (Cycleway 6) which runs from Tavistock Place in the south to Kentish Town to the north, with links to other key cycle routes and destinations both in the borough and further afield. We want to make it easier for cyclists to reach this important route so are proposing the following change:

  • To exempt eastbound cyclists on Jeffrey’s Street from the banned turn to enable them to turn right into Royal College Street and access the southbound segregated cycle lane for onward journeys  

In addition we will make the following minor changes not covered by the Traffic Management Order:

  • We will replace the one way sign (eastbound on Wilmot Place) which incorrectly indicates to drivers that the street is one way only. It does not show that cyclists are using Wilmot Place in the opposite direction. This will respond to safety concerns to ensure that drivers expect on-coming cyclists on this one-way street, particularly at the junction with St Pancras Way where cyclists frequently turn in.
  • We will install white arrow road markings on Royal College Street, at the junction with Jeffrey’s Street, both in the segregated cycle lane and on the main carriageway, to highlight the direction of traffic flow to drivers stopping at the junction.   

Any person wishing to comment or make representations to the proposed change should send their comments by email, giving reasons for any objection, to safetravel@camden.gov.uk  by Wednesday 7th October 2020.

You can access the decision report which includes drawings of the changes. 

 

Linstead Street - what are we doing?

We are making minor changes  to the pavement on Linstead Street, to provide a new cut-through for cyclists.  Currently, the northern end of Linstead Street is shut to traffic, with a continuous pavement along Netherwood Street.

A cycle cut-through will be provided through the closure, across the pavement, to link the two streets. This cut-through will enable cyclists to connect to Netherwood Street and Sherriff Road from Linstead Street, to other destinations such as West Hampstead to the east, and Kilburn to the west. Work will start from the 29th September 2020 and will include the following changes: 

  • Two ‘permit holders only’ parking bays on Netherwood Street will be removed 
  • The short section of guardrail will be removed and the cycle parking will be relocated
  • The single yellow line at the northern end of Linstead Street will be upgraded to ‘no waiting’ and ‘no loading’ at any time (double yellow lines and double kerb blips) 

These changes are being made under an Experimental Traffic Order. You can share your views and find out more on how to do this on our dedicated share your views page (see links at the top of this page). 

You can access the decision report which includes drawings of the changes. 

 

Prince of Wales Road - what are we doing?

We are currently installing a Westbound cycle lane on Prince of Wales Road, maintaining parking bays on the southern side of the road. As part of our COVID-19 Emergency response we will now be installing an eastbound cycle lane on Prince of Wales Road making it safer for cyclists, which includes:

  • Installing a 1.5m to 2m cycle lane, protected by “flexible wands” to separate the cycle lane from motor traffic.
  • Removal all of parking bays from the northern side of Prince of Wales Road, between Haverstock Hill and Grafton Road (including 46 resident parking bays, a car club bay and a loading bay).
  • Installing Shared Use Bus Stop Boarders to ensure those cycling can pass the bus stops more safely; whilst allowing bus passengers to board and alight.
  • Converting the existing zebra crossings to allow cyclists to cross the road safely.
  • Adding additional signage to ensure that motor vehicles are more aware of cyclists

These changes are being made under an Experimental Traffic Order and construction will start in August. You can share your views and find out more on how to do this on our dedicated share your views page (see links at the top of this page). 

You can view the decision report which includes full details on the changes and drawings on our website.

 

St Pancras Way - what are we doing?

As part of our COVID-19 Emergency response we will now be installing a southbound cycle lane on St Pancras Way, making it safer for cyclists, which includes:

  • Reallocating road space to cyclists, while maintaining all parking bays on the western side of St Pancras Way
  • Installing a 1.5m to 2m cycle lane, protected by “flexible wands” to separate the cycle lane from motor traffic
  • Installing a Shared Use Bus Stop Boarder between Camden Road and Agar Grove, to ensure those cycling can pass the bus stop more safely; whilst allowing bus passengers to board and alight
  • Adding additional signage to ensure that motor vehicles are more aware of cyclists

These changes are being made under an Experimental Traffic Order and construction will start in August. You can share your views and find out more on how to do this on our dedicated share your views page (see links at the top of this page). 

 You can view the decision report which includes full details on the changes and drawings.

 

St Paul's Crescent - what are we doing?

We are making minor changes to the pavement on the section of St Paul’s Crescent north of Agar Grove, to provide a new cut-through for cyclists.  Currently, there is a wide, tree covered area of public space on the lower part of this section of St Paul’s Crescent which is closed to traffic.  

A cycle cut-through will be provided through the public space, to link to Agar Grove, which will give a continuous route through Cantelowes and enable cyclists to connect to Agar Grove. There is an existing red brick surface at this location which functions as a cycle track. 

What’s going to change?

The Council will implement a cut through on St Paul’s Crecent. Work will start from the 28th September 2020 and will include the following changes: 

  • The single yellow lines on St Paul’s Crescent, where it joins the public space, will be upgraded to double yellow lines and double kerb blips (no waiting or loading at any time)
  • The guardrail panels by the traffic signals on Agar Grove will be removed

These changes are being made under an Experimental Traffic Order. You can share your views and find out more on how to do this on our dedicated share your views page (see links at the top of this page). 

You can access the decision report which includes drawings of the changes. 

 

Wilkin Street - what are we doing?


Wilkin Street runs east/west between Grafton Road and Talacre Road. Approximately half way along this street there is a fire gate i to prevent through traffic except emergency services and cyclists (who can use the cycle lane by-pass). Signage at both ends of the street indicate a ‘no through route’ for motor traffic. 

The gate is currently damaged and often left open which presents a serious safety concern, particularly when it is dark and there is reduced visibility. When open, the gate can swing across the path of cyclists, potentially causing injuries. There are also dropped kerbs with tactile paving at this location, used by pedestrians and wheelchair users to cross the street.

These pedestrians are also at risk of injuries caused by the swinging gate, as well as being vulnerable while crossing the road to collisions with drivers who should not be able to pass through this point. 

What changes are being made?

To improve road safety in this location the following changes will be made:

  • Replacing the fire gate with removable bollards: this will enable emergency services, who will have a key to the bollards, to go through the closure
  • Removing the section of cycle lane and replacing it with new cycle logos painted on the road to indicate to cyclists that they can pass between the bollards 
  • Installing additional signage at Grafton Road and Talacre Road to exempt cyclists from the ‘no through route’ signs already in place.

In addition, the Council is proposing to make the following changes to waiting and loading:

  • Changing the existing single yellow lines (parking outside the hours of control only), to double yellow lines (no parking at any time) on the section of the street west of the gate, to Talacre Road, except for a short section at the junction.  
  • Double yellow lines will prevent parking and obstruction, ensuring sufficient carriageway width for emergency service vehicles on this very narrow section of the street. 

Any person wishing to comment or make representations to the proposed change should send their comments by email, giving reasons for any objection, to safetravel@camden.gov.uk  by Wednesday 7th October 2020.

You can access the decision report which includes drawings of the changes. 

 

York Way - what are we doing?


York Way is a busy cycle route with over 1300 people cycling each day. It also has a poor road safety record for cycling with 15 cycling casualties recorded over the past 3 years.

Transport for London have identified York Way as a high priority route for installing pop-up cycle lanes due to its useful north-south alignment. It leads cyclists to many other new and existing protected cycle routes helping people get into central London via Euston Road and Gray’s Inn Road.

York Way was highlighted by 13 people via our online engagement tool (now closed but you can read the comments with a further 61 people supporting their suggestions for improved cycling conditions in this location. 

What will the work involve?


York Way is a long road, so the project will be delivered in three phases: 

  • Phase 1 – COMPLETED: Installation of protected cycle lanes in the southern half of York Way (between Wharfdale Road and Freight Lane) 
  • Phase 2 – Work starting September 2020 - Installation of protected cycle lanes in the northern half of York Way (between Freight Lane and Cliff Road/Hungerford Road). 
  • Phase 3 – PROPOSED: Changes to signalised junctions along the whole cycle route to improve safety for cyclists at junctions. This is subject to further approvals.

Upcoming work this September and October

Phase 2 of the York Way cycle lane scheme (Freight Lane to Cliff Road / Hungerford Road) will start work from the 28th September and includes the following changes:

  • Installing mandatory cycle lanes of (1.5- 2.5 metres wide) on both sides of the road wherever possible, leaving a minimum vehicular travel lane (3-3.25m wide) in each direction.
  • Installing temporary cycle lane protection called ‘kerb and wands’, inside the white cycle lane marking.  
  • Lengthening of advanced stop lines for cyclists at each junction to allow more space for cyclists to wait at junctions.
  • Replacing a mini-roundabout at Market Road with a T-junction, to make it safer for cyclists going through the junction.
  • Installing of Shared Use Bus Boarders at northbound bus stops, to maintain protection of cyclists around bus stops, whilst still enabling bus passengers to board and alight from buses at the same level. 
  • Removing or relocating some residential parking to allow the cycle lane to continue against the kerb line of the road.
  • Allowing loading in key locations only, for critical businesses, so that cyclists have fewer hazards to negotiate around. 

You can view the drawings of these changes (PDF) and images of some of the features to be installed including kerb and wands, orcas and shared use bus borders via the letter sent to residents and stakeholders (PDF).

These changes are being made under an Experimental Traffic Order. You can share your views and find out more on how to do this on our dedicated share your views page (see links at the top of this page). 

You can  access the confirmed decision for phase  1 and for phase 2 for this scheme and read the Emergency Traffic Orders and Temporary traffic orders

Cycle storage facilities

New cycle storage facilities

In support to the new and improved cycle ways we are adding new residential cycle storage facilities at various locations across the borough. So far we have added 45 new hangers providing storage space for 270 bikes taking our total in Camden to 123 cycle hangers. New locations include: 

  • Ampton Place
  • Bartholomew Road
  • Camden Square
  • Cantelowes Road
  • Dartmouth Park Road
  • Dynham Road
  • Garlinge Road
  • Garnett Road
  • Gilden Crescent
  • Gloucester Avenue
  • Goldington Street
  • Greenland Road
  • Hawley Street
  • Herbrand Street
  • Hillfield Road
  • Islip Street
  • Kings College Road
  • King Henry's Road
  • Lissenden Gardens
  • Mortimer Crescent
  • Parkhill Road 
  • Regents Square
  • Robert Street
  • Rochester Square
  • Roderick Road
  • South Villas
  • Steele's Road
  • Tonbridge Street
  • Warren Street
  • Whidborne Street
  • Whitfield Street
  • York Rise

These locations provide covered and secured storage for bikes allowing more people to keep bikes, especially where indoor space is limited. 

You can read the Non-key executive officer decision reports for the following locations:

New dockless bike hire bays

We are  going to be delivering a network of dockless bike hire bays, starting with 70 bays in the area of the borough south of the Euston Road, providing a high quality alternative to public transport and freeing up pavement space for pedestrian movement and social distancing. 

You can read the Non-key executive officer decision report for phase 1a and Phase 1b

Healthy School Streets

We are introducing a number of new healthy school streets as part of our response to the challenges of Coronavirus (COVID-19) on our streets.

To find out more on these schemes visit our healthy school streets pages

Streateries

What is a Streatery?

A Streatery is a car free outdoor dining space for restaurants, cafes and other businesses to place tables and chairs. Providing more temporary space for these businesses helps customers to physically distance whilst eating/drinking out. 

The aim of a Streatery is to help boost hospitality businesses by taking advantage of the remainder of the summer weather (and potentially for a longer period) as the lockdown continues to ease. In order to help the economic recovery of this sector, outdoor dining is expected to support increased customer numbers as sitting inside a premises will be limited due to the need to physically distance. 

Creating Streateries is one of the ways we are supporting businesses to operate differently to ensure they are COVID secure. We are working closely with local Business Improvement Districts and local stakeholders to create Streateries, in addition to relaxing planning and licensing restrictions in line with government legislation and guidance until the 30th September 2021. Full guidance on these changes can be found on our website. 

Creating Streateries across Camden will allow cafes and restaurants to serve customers alfresco by adding tables and chairs to the pavement and/or road helping to boost the local economy while keeping communities safe.
 

Changes so far

We have added Streateries at the following locations:

Charlotte Street - what are we doing?

The following changes were implemented from the 15th August 2020:

  • Temporarily widen sections of the pavement on the eastern side of Charlotte Street between Goodge Street and Percy Street to create more space for outside dining and pedestrian to physically distance
  • Temporarily suspend parking spaces along the eastern side of Charlotte Street between Goodge Street and Percy Street to create more space for outside dining and pedestrian to physically distance. This includes the suspension of the following: 
    • Parking spaces outside 2-4, 10-14, 16, 18, 22, 32, 34, 37, 38, and 40-41 Charlotte Street (including 2 electric vehicle bays)
    • The motorcycle parking spaces outside the Fitzroy Tavern
    • Temporarily relocate the existing cycle parking stands outside no. 14 (corner of Charlotte Street/ Windmill Street junction) to outside no. 16 on Windmill Street in order to provide adequate passing space for pedestrians
  • Temporarily change Charlotte Street between Rathbone Street and Percy Street to one-way street southbound only for motor traffic to reduce the amount of motor traffic and provide a more pleasant dining experience
  • Temporarily create a 1.5m wide contra-flow cycle lane on Charlotte Street between Rathbone Street and Percy Street to ensure continued cycle permeability 
  • Temporarily create dedicated loading space outside no. 24-30 and no. 36 on Charlotte Street. Loading hours will be restricted to 7am – 4pm in order to limit traffic activity during the hours that are likely to be busiest for outdoor dining. No waiting will be allowed between 4pm and 7am.

View the drawings of these changes (PDF)

Cleveland Street - what are we doing? 

The following changes were implemented from the 7th September 2020:

  • Dedicated loading space provided outside nos. 74-78 Cleveland Street. Loading hours will be restricted to 7am to 4pm to allow loading to take place in that period (lunchtime dining will not be significantly affected as the number of deliveries is not expected to be high) and ensuring no such loading takes place during evening dining periods.
  • Single yellow lines changed to double yellow lines in the area opposite the boundary of no.68/70 for 48.5m to junction with Grafton Way.
  • The following parking spaces will be temporarily suspended to encompass the period that the tables and chairs licences will be applied for, for a maximum six months. 
    • Parking spaces on Cleveland Street outside no. 66-72 and 80-84
    • The resident parking space on Cleveland Street outside nos.94-96
    • The resident parking spaces on Cleveland Street outside nos.122-124 
    • The paid parking spaces on Cleveland Street outside nos.126-128

The scheme will be reviewed after 6 months if there is a desire to keep these measures in place.

View drawings of these changes (PDF) 

Drummond Street - what are we doing?

The following changes were implemented from the 14th August 2020:

  • Temporarily widening the pavement on Drummond Street between North Gower Street and Cobourg Street. This will require all parking bays to be suspended to create more space for outside dining and pedestrian to physically distance
  • Temporarily providing space for loading on Drummond Street between North Gower Street and Cobourg Street which will be restricted to between 8am and 12pm. Loading bays will be located outside nos. 125-129 and at the end of the parking bay at the eastern end of Drummond Street. This will create more space for outside dining and pedestrian to physically distance
  • Temporarily widening the pavement on the northern side of Drummond Street between North Gower Street and Hampstead Road in front of nos. 124-128. Parking bays will be suspended where the footway widening takes place to create more space for outside dining and pedestrian to physically distance
  • The disabled parking space outside no. 130 will be retained. Loading activity will be allowed on the southern side of Drummond Street following existing arrangements.

View the drawings of these changes (PDF)

 Goodge Street - what are we doing?

The following changes were implemented from the 17th August 2020:

  • Temporarily widen sections of the pavement on each side of Goodge Street between Charlotte Street and Tottenham Court Road to create more space for outside dining and pedestrian to physically distance
  • Temporarily suspend parking spaces on each side of Goodge Street between Charlotte Street and Tottenham Court Road to create more space for outside dining and pedestrian to physically distance. This includes the suspension of the following:
    • Parking spaces outside 5-11, 25-29, 26-30 and no. 36 on Goodge Street
  • Temporarily relocating existing cycle parking outside nos. 21-23 Goodge Street into the widened space outside no. 8 in order to provide additional passing space for social distancing
  • Temporarily removing one lane of traffic on Goodge Street between Whitfield Street and Tottenham Court Road on the northern side to create a 1.75m wide mandatory cycle lane 
  • Temporarily providing loading spaces outside Tesco (no. 10-16) and no. 38-40. Loading hours will be restricted to 7am – 4pm in order to limit traffic activity during the hours that are usually busiest for dining. No waiting allowed between 4pm and 7am

View the drawings of these changes (PDF)

South End Green - what are we doing?

The following changes were implemented after 13th August 2020:

  • Relocating bus stand for route 168 to Fleet Road.
  • Widening a section of South End Road between Pond Street and South End Green to create a space for cafes and restaurants to have additional outdoor tables on the pavement and space for pedestrians to walk in the newly created space. The new space will be made up from the relocated bus stand and by removing 1 Pay by Phone parking space. The cycle stand outside No.1 South End Road will be relocated to outside No.17.
  • Widening the pavement on South End Road between Heath Hurst Road and Keats Grove to create space for the cafes and restaurants to place additional seating on the pavement and create more space for pedestrians to observe physical distancing.This will involve suspending 8 Pay by Phone parking spaces and relocating 1 loading bay.
  • Providing an additional bus stand on Fleet Road. This will involve removing 1 redundant Disabled parking bay, 3 Pay by Phone parking spaces, and 1 resident parking bay on Fleet Road.

View the drawings of these changes - Upper Section (PDF)

View the drawings of these changes - Lower Section (PDF)


Warren Street - what are we doing?

The following changes were implemented from the 7th September 2020:

  • Parking spaces on Warren Street outside nos. 5-15 have been suspended to allow adequate passing space for social distancing and additional space for tables and chairs.
  • 1 paid parking space (13876) suspended on Warren Street outside no.35 Conway Street which is on the corner of Warren Street and Conway Street to create extra space for widening the pavement.
  • A no motor vehicles zone on Warren Street between Fitzroy Street and Grafton Mews has been created. To supplement the bollards outside 20/55 Warren Street a no Motor Vehicles signs will be installed at the junction of Fitzroy Street and Warren Street and the road access will be narrowed with 2 blocks and 1 removable bollard. 3.5m emergency access will be maintained.
  • 7m of double yellow lines and 1m of single yellow lines suspended outside nos.56-57 Warren Street for an Ambulance Bay. A new sign reading “No stopping Except Ambulances” will be installed on an existing lamp column outside no.56.
  • The pavement outside no.25-29 Warren Street has been widened between the paid for parking bay (14104) and 2 residents parking bays outside nos.25-27 Warren Street will be suspended.

View drawings of these changes (PDF)

Arlington Road area Low Traffic Neighbourhood

We are making the streets around the Arlington Road area, from Mornington Crescent to Camden Town, safer and friendlier for pedestrians, people with mobility scooters or wheelchairs, children and those who cycle. The changes will significantly reduce the amount of vehicles using these residential streets to cut-through between main roads, including Heavy Goods Vehicles. We are going to make these street quieter, safer and healthier as well as contribute to cleaner air just as the community asked.

What is the challenge in the Arlington Road Area?

Residents have told us:

  • While lockdown was in place they enjoyed the quieter streets and cleaner air, with more space to walk and cycle locally without cars.
  • That motor vehicles, including heavy goods vehicles, use the residential streets to the west of Camden High Street between Mornington Crescent and Camden Town as a cut through to avoid using main roads.
  • That significant volumes of traffic are using Mornington Street and Mornington Crescent to access Camden High Street, and lots of through traffic uses streets north of Parkway.

On our Commonplace engagement website we had a large number of comments
making great suggestions on how to improve this part of Camden.

In July 2020 a petition signed by 613 people asked for a local weight restriction on streets in
this area to create a Low Emission Neighbourhood / Low Traffic Neighbourhood.

We are also aware that Transport for London are considering, as part of Streetspace for London plans, improvements to bus lanes and widening pavements on the southern section of Camden High Street. If these proposals do come forward, this could also increase the number of cars trying to take short cuts. TfL will share details on plans on their Streetspace website.

What's going to change?

We are making the changes to reduce traffic levels on the residential streets around the Arlington Road area from Mornington Crescent to Camden Town, as well on Buck Street:

We will do this by making changes at six different locations. The measures will include restricting traffic via no entry signs, planters, islands and cameras.

Work started on the 24th September between 9am and 5pm - some minor noise should be expected.

What’s not going to change?

  • How you drive to a property might change but you will still be able to reach every house, on every street by car and receive home deliveries.
  • Pedestrians and those on bikes will always be able to travel freely without restrictions.
  • Emergency services and refuse vehicles can always access every property.

Finding out more

These changes are being made under an Experimental Traffic Order. You can share your views and find out more on how to do this on our dedicated share your views page (see links at the top of this page). 

You can access the decision report which also includes drawings of the changes. 

You can read the letter (PDF) which went out to all local residents and stakeholders. 

You can also view a map of the changes and visuals (PDF) to help you understand how the changes will look on each street, although the final scheme may look slightly different. You can see detailed drawings which shows the full changes within the decision report. 

Brecknock Road

What’s the challenge on Brecknock Road?


On our Commonplace engagement website we had a large number of comments making great suggestions on how to improve this part of Camden.

On Brecknock Road we know that there are sections of very narrow pavement particularly on the stretch between Leighton Road and Camden Road (western side). This is a busy section with 2 supermarkets, a number of independent shops and eateries. The current pavement does not provide enough space for people to queue for shops and walk past while maintaining physical distancing.

This issue could worsen if more businesses take advantage of the ability to add tables and chairs to the pavement. 

We also want to support our own Transport Strategy priorities which include increasing walking and cycling, improving public transport, improving air quality and making our streets and transport networks safe, accessible and inclusive for all.

What’s going to change?

In order to respond to the challenge of narrow pavements we are going to be temporarily widening sections on the western side of Brecknock Road which falls under Camden responsibility (the eastern side is Islington Borough Council). This will make it easier for people to maintain a physical distance while shopping or walking through the area as well supporting local businesses to keep their customers safe to boost business.

To do this we will:

  • Temporarily widen sections of pavement on Brecknock Road between Leighton Road and Camden Road creating extra space for pedestrians while shopping or walking through the area.
  • Temporarily add water filled barriers with gaps left for refuse collection to protect pedestrians from the road. 
  • Remove 22.1m of shared loading/parking spaces to create more space for pedestrians including;
    •  One pay by phone space outside 43 Brecknock Road
    • 2 pay at machine spaces outside 33/35 Brecknock Road 
    • One shared loading bay/pay by phone parking bay outside 21 Heath Street

Work is scheduled to start from Saturday 26th September between 9am and 5pm - this will not be noisy work.

Drawings of what these changes will look like can be found in the decision report for the scheme. 

Clarence Way and Hartland Road

What are the challenges on Clarence Way and Hartland Road?

We know from previous engagement with the local community, from the Camden Town Low Emission Neighbourhood Commonplace map, and stakeholders, such as Holy Trinity & St. Silas School, that there is a concern that these streets are being used by motor vehicles as a short cut between Chalk Farm Road, Prince of Wales Road and Kentish Town Road. There was also a concern of dangerous driving. In order to respond to this issue we have added bollards throughout the area to create a lower traffic area.

What will the work involve?

The changes we have made on Clarence Way and Hartland Road are as follows to prevent through traffic:

  • Installing droppable bollards at the junction of Harmood Street and Clarence Way
  • Installing droppable bollards on Hartland Road north of the junction with Clarence Way (at Holy Trinity & St. Silas School/Church)
  • Installing a ‘No Motor Vehicle Sign’ on Hartland Road northeast of the junction of (the western part of) Hawley Road
  • Amendment 23/6/2020:
    • We are changing the recently installed vehicular traffic prohibition (‘No Motor Vehicle Sign’) on Hartland Road, near the junction of Hawley Road, from a signage only vehicle prohibition to a physical vehicle prohibition using bollards.

Access to all properties on both sides of the restriction has been maintained so residents are still able to reach their homes by car and receive home deliveries but through-traffic has been prevented. Pedestrians and cyclists can continue to travel through at all times. Emergency services and bin collection teams can lower the bollard for access.

This change has reduced the amount of cars moving through these streets making it safer for people walking and cycling locally, to shop, reach Castlehaven open space and Holy Trinity and St. Silas School.

View the drawings of these changes (PDF)

View the updated drawing of the bollards on Hartland Road and Hawley Road Junction (PDF)

Chetwynd Road

What is the challenge on Chetwynd Road?

There is a very narrow pavement on what is a busy residential street popular as a route to various Hampstead schools and Hampstead Heath. We are aware of pressures for space particularly as parking is provided on the pavement making it very challenging to use a wheelchair or push buggies. Wider pavements in this location have also been requested via the Commonplace map to assist physical distancing. 

In order to respond to the challenge of narrow pavements in this location we have temporarily widening sections by removing parking bays to create passing places for pedestrians, making it easier for people to maintain a physical distance while moving through this area.   

What will the work involve?

The changes we have made on both sides of Chetwynd Road include creating new wider spaces on the pavement for pedestrians by removing parking bays.  We have used temporary barriers to mark out these new spaces:

  • We have removed 5m of parking space every 10 to 15m of resident permit holders parking bays to accommodate passing space for pedestrians 
  • This has created new wider pockets of pavement between 3.1m – 3.4m wide.
  • Approximately 19 spaces were approved to be removed, however 3 of these have not be removed. These are location on the southern side between York Rise and Highgate Road.

You can view drawings of these changes drawing 1 and drawing 2 (updated 16.6.20). (PDF)

Constantine Road and Savernake Road

What is the challenge on Constantine Road and Savernake Road?

We know that these roads have a high volume of motor vehicles as people use Savernake Road to avoid the junction at Agincourt Road and Mansfield Road. Additionally previous local engagement relating to the Gospel Oak Healthy School Street scheme has highlighted a wish for an extension to the restrictions already in place.

Following the recent consultation, the Healthy School Street scheme has been made permanent, subject to statutory process as per the published decision.

In order to respond to this challenge we have added bollards on Savernake Road outside the entrance to Hampstead Heath between Lisburne Road and Roderick Road to prevent through-motor traffic.

What will the work involve?

The change we have made on Constantine Road and Savernake Road is as follows:

  • Preventing through-motor traffic along Constantine Road/Savernake Road by installing droppable bollards between Roderick Road and Lisburne Road (near the entrance to Hampstead Heath). 

Access to all properties on both sides of the restriction has been maintained so residents are still able to reach their homes by car and receive deliveries but through-traffic is prevented. Pedestrians and cyclists will be able to travel through at all times. Emergency services and bin collection teams are able to lower the bollards for access.

This change reduces the amount of cars moving along Constantine Road and Savernake Road making it safer for people walking and cycling locally, to shop, reach the entrance to Hampstead Heath, Gospel Oak Primary School and the Royal Free Hospital. 

View the drawings of these changes (PDF)

Hampstead High Street

What is the challenge on Hampstead High Street?

On Hampstead High Street specifically we know that there are sections of very narrow pavement. This is a popular destination for both residents and visitors and we have received requests for urgent action to mitigate busy locations outside Hampstead tube station, Gail’s Bakery, the Post Office and the Hampstead Butcher where queues have made it difficult for other pedestrians to pass by. In addition wider pavements have been requested via the Commonplace map to assist physical distancing. 

In order to respond to the challenge of narrow pavements in this location we have been temporarily widening sections, making it easier for people to maintain a physical distance while shopping, queuing or moving through this area.   

What will the work involve?

The changes we have made on Hampstead High Street include widening the pavement in the following locations using temporary barriers to protect pedestrians from vehicles:

  • Outside Gail’s Bakery – removing all parking bays between the junction of Heath Street and the bakery creating an extra 2m space for pedestrians
  • Outside the Post Office – removing a motorcycle parking bay and part of a loading bay creating an extra 2m for pedestrians
  • Outside The Hampstead Butcher – removing resident permit holder parking bays creating an extra 1.58m for pedestrians 
  • Opposite Hampstead tube station – removing one lane of traffic to create 3.9m of pavement for pedestrians

You can view drawings of these changes. Drawing 1 (PDF) and drawing 2. (PDF)

Heath Street

What are the challenges on Heath Street?

On Heath Street specifically we know that there are sections of very narrow pavement particularly outside popular shops and cafes. This is a busy area and is one of the neighbourhood’s main shopping area with a diverse mix of retail and non-retail outlets. The current pavement does not provide enough space for people to queue for shops and walk past while maintaining physical distancing. This issue could worsen if more businesses take advantage of the ability to add tables and chairs to the pavement. 

Wider pavements have also been requested through our online engagement tool Commonplace, where we invited people to suggest locations where new walking and cycling projects might be needed to facilitate physical distancing requirements. Narrow pavements on Heath Street were highlighted, with, for example, 18 people supporting one suggestion to widen the pavement.  This Commonplace tool is now closed but you can read the comments made on the website

In order to respond to the challenge of narrow pavements in this location we have been temporarily widening sections on both sides of Heath Street. This will make it easier for people to maintain a physical distance while shopping or walking through the area as well supporting local businesses to keep their customers safe and boost business.

What will the work involve?

The changes we have made on Heath Street include widening the pavement in the following locations using temporary barriers to protect pedestrians from vehicles:

  • Temporarily widening sections of pavement on Heath Street between the junction with Hampstead High Street and Oriel Place creating extra space for pedestrians to walk locally while limiting their need to step into the road. This includes:
    • Increasing the pavement to 3.79m wide by the Tesco Express
    • Providing an extra 1.72m of pavement width outside Artichoke and Louis Patisserie
  • Removing 16m of parking spaces to create more space for pedestrians including:
    • Three pay by phone parking spaces outside 32-36 Heath Street
  • Temporarily adding water filled barriers with gaps left for refuse collection to protect pedestrians from the road

You can view drawings of these changes (PDF)

Highgate Road

What are the challenges of Highgate Road?

On Highgate Road specifically we know there are delays in bus journey times outside the existing hours of operation of the bus lanes.

It is important that those needing to travel by bus (such as NHS staff and other keyworkers) are able to do so safely, with bus journey times maintained or improved wherever possible. As bus use continues to grow, this increase needs to be facilitated for. 

Analysis by TfL has identified that bus use is spread much more evenly across the day, compared to pre-lockdown, meaning peaks are less critical than they used to be. As a result, peak-hour/part time bus lanes are less appropriate, and hours need to be spread across the day to reflect this change in usage. 

In order to respond to inadequate bus journey times and align with Transport for London’s policy, we have extended the hours of operation of bus lanes along Highgate Road to Monday to Sunday 24/7. 

Safer cycling facilities along Highgate Road have also been requested through our online engagement tool Commonplace, where we invited people to suggest locations where new walking and cycling projects might be needed to facilitate physical distancing requirements.

The extension of bus lane hours will provide a safe space for cyclists to use throughout the day with reduced vehicular traffic. This Commonplace tool is now closed but you can read the comments made on the website.  
 

What are the changes we are making?

To improve bus journey times along Highgate Road at all times of the day, and provide a safer space for those cycling we have made a number of changes in this location. 

The changes include:

  • Extension of bus lane hours of the following bus lanes on Highgate Road from their existing hours of operation to Monday-Sunday 24/7:
    • CMO15: southbound between the junctions of Highgate Road/St Albans Road and Highgate Road/Dartmouth Park Road, with existing hours of operation of Monday to Friday from 7am to 10am.
    • CMO16: northbound between the junction of Highgate Road/Wesleyan Place and Highgate Road o/s 101 Highgate Road, with existing hours of Monday to Friday from 7am to 7pm. 
    • CMO17: southbound between the junctions of Highgate Road/Burghley Road and Highgate Road/Fortess Road/Kentish Town Road, with original hours of Monday to Friday from 7am to 10am and 4pm to 7pm, and on Saturdays from 10am to 7pm
  • Cycles and Taxis will continue to be permitted to use the bus lanes.
  • All existing waiting and loading restrictions have been changed to provide double yellow lines with double blips, preventing both waiting and loading at any time within the bus lanes.
  • Two new loading bays for the servicing of commercial properties have been added (outside 109-111 Highgate Road and outside 12 Highgate Road), with hours of operation of 7pm-7am. 

You can view the decision report which includes full details on the changes and drawings

Kentish Town Road

What is the challenge on Kentish Town Road?

On Kentish Town Road specifically we know that there are sections of very narrow pavements on what is a busy high street. We are aware of pressures for space particularly on the stretch between Prince of Wales Road and Leighton Road on the western side which has 4 supermarkets. This section is too narrow for people to pass and queue for the supermarkets while maintaining physical distance.

We were aware of pedestrians having to put themselves at risk by stepping out into the road or having to walk close to others. Wider pavements in this location have also been requested via the Commonplace map to assist physical distancing.

In order to respond to the challenge of narrow pavements in this location we have been temporarily widening sections, making it easier for people to maintain a physical distance while shopping, queuing or moving through this area.   


What will the work involve?

The changes we have made on Kentish Town Road include widening the pavement in the following locations creating up to 2.8m of extra space in some locations.  We are using temporary barriers to protect pedestrians from vehicles:

  • Outside Sainsbury’s – removing loading/pay by phone parking bays and creating extra space for pedestrians
  • Outside Tesco – taking an area of road space creating extra space for pedestrians
  • Outside Lidl and on the junction with Anglers Lane – taking an area of road space creating extra space for pedestrians
  • Outside Iceland - taking an area of road space creating extra space for pedestrians

View drawings of these changes : upper section (PDF) and lower section (PDF) 

Kilburn High Road

What is the challenge on Kilburn High Road?

We already know from previous local engagement that there are strong local priorities around improving safety, reducing street clutter and improving the local air quality on Kilburn High Road. As a major town centre we know that the pavements are very congested making physical distancing difficult. We have been liaising with Brent Council (who have responsibility for the western side of the road) as we have both received concerns via local groups including the West Hampstead and Amenity Transport Group and Kilburn Life, alongside residents calling for changes to be made to address the narrow pavements.

Brent Council has predicted that as the lockdown continues to ease, the side of Kilburn High Road that belongs to them will be less heavily congested due to the lower number of supermarkets along that side of the road.

In line with our partners and Brent Council, we would therefore encourage those not using the supermarkets to use the western side of Kilburn High Road.

By working together, we aim to increase safe access to retailers while also ensuring that, in particular, emergency vehicles are able to pass along the road easily at this time. 

In order to respond to the challenge of narrow pavements in this location we have temporarily widened sections making it easier for people to maintain a physical distance while shopping, queuing or moving through this area. Brent Council have also widened sections on their side of the road. 

What will the work involve?

The temporary changes we have made on Kilburn High Road are as follows:

  • Widening the pavement on the eastern side between Willesden Lane and Belsize Road using temporary barriers to protect pedestrians from vehicles 
  • Where possible increasing the total width of pavement to 5.8m to allow people to pass each other and allow queuing. Where queuing is not taking place we are aiming for a minimum width of 3.2m where possible

View drawings of these changes (PDF) 

Millfield Lane

What are the challenges on Millfield Lane?

On Milfield Lane specifically we know that there are sections of very narrow footway and a lack of footway outside Millfield Cottage. This is a residential street which is a popular route to access Hampstead Heath. Due to the lack of pavement in this location pedestrians have been seen having to step out into the road on a bend where there is limited visibility which is a safety concern.

Additionally the narrow road often forces cars to reverse to let other cars pass causing an added hazard for pedestrians trying to physically distance along the narrow pavements .Wider footways have also been requested via the Commonplace map to assist physical distancing.

In order to respond to the challenge of narrow pavements and a lack of visibility on the bend we have been temporarily widening sections, and changing the layout of the road making it easier for people to maintain a physical distance while accessing the heath. In addition, we have changed the road to one way for motor traffic between 16 Millfield lane and the junction with Merton Lane.


What will the work involve?

The changes we have made on Millfield Lane include widening the pavement in the following locations using temporary barriers to protect pedestrians from vehicles and increasing visibility on the bend in the road:

  • Outside 16 Millfield Lane – removing one permit holder bay to increase visibility around the bend
  • Outside 22 and 24 Millfield Lane – removing 15m of parking space to allow the road to be narrowed to create a new pavement space for pedestrians on the side of Hampstead Heath of between 1.2m and 3.5m wide protected by water filled barriers
  • Between the bend and the junction with Merton Lane – changing Millfield Lane to one way northbound for motor traffic to reduce hazardous vehicle movements
  • The road will remain two way for cyclists

You can view drawings showing the change to this location. Drawing 1 and drawing 2 and overview drawing.

Museum Street

What are the challenges on Museum Street?

Museum Street is a busy street with narrow pavements close to the British Museum and numerous independent retail/restaurants/cafes/businesses and residential apartments.

On our Commonplace engagement website we had numerous comments making great suggestions on how to improve this part of Camden.

The Covid-19 pandemic has created new challenges for our local economy and on Museum Street local businesses have requested widened footways to allow for outside space for tables and chairs. 

The Council is committed to supporting our local businesses to trade safely while keeping them safe and secure for our communities. This scheme also helps to deliver our own Transport Strategy priorities, which were strongly supported when we consulted on them, including increasing walking and making our streets and transport networks safe, accessible and inclusive for all.

What will the work involve?

We are making changes on Museum Street, between Bloomsbury Way (A40) and Little Russell Street, to make it safer and easier for you to walk in the area to reach key locations and to enable local businesses to place more socially distance tables and chairs outside, in response to Covid-19. This will keep pedestrians and customers safe and create a more enjoyable space. 

To do this we will:

  • Remove paid parking bays along the western side of Museum Street
  • Relocate the loading bay on the western side of Museum Street to the eastern side 
  • Implement a temporary pavement on the eastern side of Museum Street using plastic barriers
  • Create a new space for socially distanced tables and chairs to be placed, while the existing pavement will be kept free for pedestrians to safely socially distance.
  • Expect to start work from the 22nd October, between 9am and 5pm - some minor noise should be expected.

Finding out more

You can access the decision report which also includes drawings of the changes. 

You can read the letter (PDF) which went out to all local residents and stakeholders. (TBC)

Prowse Place

What is the challenge on Prowse Place?


We know that this area is often used as a rat- run between Camden Street and Royal College Street/St.Pancras Way. This has been highlighted by local residents as an issue that will be heightened by TfL’s proposal for a banned left turn from Camden Street into Camden Road. 

To respond to this challenge this scheme will have restricted through traffic on Prowse Place. This will reduce the number of vehicles using this very narrow railway bridge underpass and make those of streets bounded by Camden Road, Camden Street and Royal College Street into a Low Traffic Neighbourhood. 


What will the work involve?

The changes we have made on Prowse Place are as follows to prevent through traffic:

  • Installing a ‘droppable’ bollards (which can be dropped temporarily by emergency services and refuse vehicles) between Bonny Street and Ivor Street.

Access to all properties on both sides of the restriction have been maintained so people can still reach their homes by car and receive home deliveries but through-traffic will be prevented. Pedestrians and cyclists are able to travel through at all times. Emergency services and bin collection teams will be able to lower the bollard for access.

This change will reduce the amount of cars moving through these streets making it safer for people walking and cycling locally while also enable people to socially distance while walking under the railway bridge arch.


View the drawings of these changes (PDF) 

Red Lion Street and Dane Street

What are the challenges on Red Lion Street and Dane Street ?


We know from previous engagement with local Ward Councillors that there is a 
‘rat-running’ issue between Theobalds Road and Procter Street/High Holborn. Suggestions to reduce through traffic have also been made on the Making Travel in Safer in Camden Commonplace by members of the public. 

To respond to this challenge we have added bollards on to Dane Street and Red Lion Street to prevent through traffic. This will reduce the number of vehicles using both Red Lion Street and  Dane Street, as a short cut from Theobalds Road (A401) and to the A40 (Procter Street and High Holborn) for vehicles wishing to avoid the signals at Theobalds Road and Procter St. 

What will the work involve?
 

The changes we have made on Dane Street and Red Lion Street are as follows to prevent through traffic:

  • Installing droppable fixed and removable bollards and “Motor Vehicles Prohibited” signage between the two existing parking bays on Dane Street
  • Dane Street will become two way, but no access through the bollards (except cycles, emergency services and refuse vehicles)
  • Install droppable fixed and removable bollards, and “Motor Vehicles Prohibited” signage on Red Lion Street at the junction with Princeton Street
  • Remove 1 business parking bay and post on Red Lion Street
  • Temporary signage stating ‘Red Lion Street closed ahead for motor vehicles’ will be placed at the junction of Red Lion Street and Theobalds Road and at the junction of High Holborn and Red Lion Street
  • Temporary signage stating “No access to High Holborn for motor vehicles” at the junction of Bedford Row and Princeton Street
  • Install “Motor Vehicles Prohibited” signage on Red Lion Street to the south of the zebra crossing

This scheme will restrict through traffic on Dane Street and Red Lion Street via the introduction of ‘droppable’ bollard (which can be dropped temporarily by emergency services and refuse vehicles). 

These changes will reduce the amount of cars moving through these streets making it safer for people walking and cycling in the area. 
 

View the drawings of these changes (PDF) 

Regent's Park Road

What are the challenges on Regent’s Park Road?

On Regent’s Park Road specifically we know that there are sections of very narrow pavement particularly outside popular cafes and restaurants which have tables and chairs outside. This is a busy and vibrant area which is a popular destination for local residents and visitors who are visiting to access Primrose Hill and/or the local vibrant selection of shops, restaurants, cafes and bars. The current pavement does not provide enough space for people to queue for shops, negotiate tables and chairs and walk past while maintaining physical distancing. 

Wider pavements have also been requested through our online engagement tool Commonplace, where we invited people to suggest locations where new walking and cycling projects might be needed to facilitate physical distancing requirements. For example one comment highlighting the narrow pavements on Regent’s Park Road was supported by 15 others.  This Commonplace tool is now closed but you can read the comments made on the website.

In order to respond to the challenge of narrow pavements in this location we have temporarily widened sections on both sides of Regent’s Park Road. This will make it easier for people to maintain a physical distance while visiting their local green space, shopping or walking through the area as well supporting local businesses to keep their customers safe and boost business.


What will the work involve?

The changes we have made on Regent’s Park Road include widening the pavement in the following locations using temporary barriers to protect pedestrians from vehicles:

  • Temporarily widening sections of pavement on Regent’s Park Road between the junction with Gloucester Avenue and St George’s Terrace creating extra space for pedestrians to walk locally while limiting their need to step into the road. 
  • Temporarily remove parking spaces to create more pavement space. This includes:
    • 3 Shared resident permit and pay by phone bays outside numbers 148/150 Regent’s Park Road
    • 3 Shared resident permit and pay by phone bays outside numbers 136/138 Regent’s Park Road
    • 2 doctor permit holder bays outside 99/101 Regent’s Park Road
    • 1 Shared resident permit and pay by phone bay outside number 91 Regent’s Park Road
    • 3 Shared resident permit and pay by phone bays outside number 89 Regent’s Park Road
    • 2 Shared resident permit and pay by phone bays outside numbers 67-73 Regent’s Park Road
    • 2 Shared resident permit and pay by phone bays outside number 49 Regent’s Park Road
  • Temporarily adding water filled barriers with gaps left for refuse collection to protect pedestrians from the road 

View the drawings of these changes (PDF) 

Sandall Road

What is the challenge on Sandall Road?

We know from previous engagement with the local community and stakeholders during the Kentish Town Healthy Streets project that there is a concern that drivers are using Sandall Road to travel east to west from the A503 (Camden Road) to the A400 (Kentish Town Road) through an area of residential streets. In order to respond to this issue we have added a bollard on Sandall Road near to the entrance to Cantelowes Gardens.

What will the work involve?

The change we have made on Sandall Road is as follows:

  • Preventing through-motor traffic along Sandall Road by installing a droppable bollard near the junction with Camden Road 

Access to all properties on both sides of the restriction has been maintained so residents are still able to reach their homes by car and receive home deliveries but through-traffic has been prevented. Pedestrians and cyclists can continue to travel through at all times. Emergency services and bin collection teams can lower the bollard for access.

This change reduces the amount of through traffic travelling between Camden Road and Kentish Town Road via Sandall Road making it safer for people walking and cycling locally, to shop, reach the entrance to Cantelowes Garden and Camden School for Girls.

View the drawings of these changes (PDF)

Seven Dials

What are the challenges at Seven Dials?

Seven Dials is a busy mixed-use area of Central London and is home to over 150 independent retail and restaurant / café businesses as well as three hotels, three theatres, hundreds of office workers and over 290 residential apartments. We know from previous engagement with the local community and stakeholders that there is large amounts of rat running traffic cutting across the area via Mercer Street and Monmouth Street. As a busy commercial location with high pedestrian footfall there was an existing need for improved pedestrian safety and amenities which was being explored before the pandemic.

Through our online engagement tool Commonplace, we invited people to suggest locations where new walking and cycling projects might be needed to facilitate physical distancing requirements. Seven Dials was highlighted by 5 comments, with a further 34 people supporting those suggestions, for reducing rat running through traffic restrictions, changes to the one way system and road closures.

In order to respond to the issue of rat running we have reduced through traffic by adding bollards to a number of streets with some 24 hr restrictions and some timed restrictions in addition to changes to traffic direction. These changes will make the area quieter and safer for pedestrians and cyclists, helping “re-open” this important commercial area, and provide more space for people to physically distance, introduce new cycling and pocket park facilities and prevent through traffic all while still allowing for residential access. 

You can view drawings of these changes: Simple overview (PDF), detailed overview (PDF)

What will the work involve?

We are aware that emergency gas works will be occurring during July – September. There will be traffic management restrictions and diversions which are unrelated to this scheme in place during this time.  

The following changes have been implemented:

Roads closed to motor traffic between 10am and 6pm seven days a week to:

  • Monmouth Street from the junction with Shaftesbury Avenue  
  • Mercer Street at the junction with Shelton Street except for access (parking permit holders, off-street vehicle accesses and hotel pick up and drop offs)
  • Neal Street (north) from the junction of Short’s Gardens

Roads closed to motor traffic seven days a week to:

  • Monmouth Street from the junctions of Tower Street and Shelton Street preventing access to and from Upper St Martin’s Lane

Earlham Street Market will be operational but stalls have been relocated to the pavement to provide more space for pedestrians. To facilitate this there will be no access for vehicles (aside from construction traffic and local access) between 7am and 7pm Monday – Saturday on the following roads:

  • Earlham Street (west) from the junction with Seven Dials
  • The whole length of Tower Street
  • Monmouth St between Tower Street and Seven Dials

Traffic directions on the following streets to be reversed at all times:

  • Short’s Gardens between Seven Dials and Endell Street
  • Monmouth Street between Tower Street and Seven Dials 

Parking and loading bays have been removed from across the area in order to increase space for pedestrians and cyclists including on Monmouth Street between Seven Dials and Upper St Martin’s Lane and on Short’s Gardens. Some resident bays have been added to Mercer Street, Earlham Street (east) and Tower Street. Overall there will be a reduction of 22 resident parking spaces.

A one way system is operating at Neal’s Yard for pedestrians and the informal seating and planters temporarily removed to provide more space for physical distancing. Pedestrians can access Neal’s Yard from Monmouth Street and exit via Short’s Gardens or further south on Monmouth Street. A diagram showing these access routes can be viewed. (PDF)

A dockless bike hire bay and cycle stands have been added to the south of Monmouth Street providing a new facility for cyclists in addition to a pocket park area.

Local access

Timed closures are controlled by removable bollards so that emergency services and refuse lorries can still enter. The bollards are managed by the Seven Dials security team. Cyclists and pedestrians will be able to pass through each closure at any time.

The timed closure at Mercer Street junction with Shelton Street, is staffed and access will be allowed for residents, commercial access to 164 Shaftesbury Avenue building and to facilitate hotel pick up and drop offs only. Individuals with applicable resident parking permits will also be allowed access.

Local deliveries can be undertaken during timed closures by utilising the loading bays on Endell Street north of Short’s Gardens.

These mearsure are in place to manage and ensure access for the duration of the project. To view these in-full, download a copy of the Seven Dials Operational Procedures Plan (PDF).

Swain's Lane

What is the challenge on Swain’s Lane?

We know from the Making Travel in Safer in Camden Commonplace platform, that a number of suggestions to reduce through traffic on Swain’s Lane have been made in addition to concerns over the lack of room for physical distancing.

There have also been comments on rat running suggesting that traffic use Swain's Lane as a cut through to avoid Highgate West Hill and Dartmouth Park Hill, as well as issues of speeding traffic and cyclists feeling unsafe.

To respond to these challenges we are preventing through traffic in order to prevent this rat running and reduce the ability of cars to speed in the area. 

What will the work involve?

The changes we have made on Swain’s Lane are as follows to prevent through traffic:

  • Installing signage to ban a right turn at two locations on the northern end of Swain’s Lane
  • Installing signage to ban a right turn from Swain’s Lane into Bisham Gardens and from Swain’s Lane into South Grove Place

There is a risk that the signs will not be adhered to by all motorists and therefore officers will monitor the effectiveness of the scheme and install Automatic Number Plate Recognition (ANPR) camera(s) if repeat infringements occur. 

Access to all properties has been maintained so residents will still be able to reach their homes by car and receive home deliveries but through-traffic from Highgate West Hill to Highgate High Street via Swain’s Lane will be prevented via the banned turns. Pedestrians and cyclists are able to travel through at all times. Emergency services and bin collection teams will be able to lower the bollard for access.

View the drawings of these changes (PDF) 

Well Walk

What is the challenge on Well Walk?

On Well Walk specifically we know that there are sections of very narrow pavement. This is a popular route for both residents and visitors accessing Hampstead Heath. In addition wider pavements have also been requested via the Commonplace map to assist physical distancing. 

In order to respond to the challenge of narrow pavements in this location we have temporarily widened sections, making it easier for people to maintain a physical distance while accessing their local green space in addition to the customers of the Wells Tavern once they reopen.    

What will the work involve?

The changes we have made on Well Walk include widening the pavement in the following locations using temporary barriers to protect pedestrians from vehicles:

  • Between Gainsborough Gardens and Christchurch Hill outside The Wells Tavern – removing 51m of resident permit holder parking bays creating extra space for pedestrians to walk to their local green space while limiting their need to step into the road
  • Pedestrians will be protected from the road by water filled barriers and gaps left for refuse collection

You can view drawings of these changes (PDF)
 

Wilmot Place

What is the challenge on Wilmot Place?

We know from previous engagement with the local community and stakeholders from the Kentish Town Healthy Streets project Commonplace map that there is a concern that Wilmot Place and Rochester Road are being used by motor vehicles to avoid the junction of St Pancras Way and Camden Road. In order to respond to this issue we have added barriers and a bollard on Wilmot Place near the junction of Wilmot Place and St Pancras Way to prevent through traffic.

What will the work involve?

The change we have made on Wilmot Place is as follows:

  • Preventing through-motor traffic along Wilmot Place and Rochester Road by installing barriers and a droppable bollard near the junction of Wilmot Place and St Pancras Way. 

Access to all properties on both sides of the restriction has been maintained so residents are still able to reach their homes by car and receive home deliveries but through-traffic is prevented. Pedestrians and cyclists can continue to travel through at all times. Emergency services and bin collection teams are able to lower the bollard for access.

This change reduces the amount of motor vehicles moving through these streets making it safer for people walking and cycling locally, to shop and reach the entrance to Rochester Terrace Gardens.

View the drawings of these changes (PDF)